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Comments

  • ouchris

    ouchris

    March 11, 2015, 1:46 am

    I'm a libertarian but I have an elementary understanding of the depression and it's fixes. I've read a few books with many facts detailing how it was not New Deal policies and that they made the situation worse. This is obvious in that the depression wasn't over until about 1946, some 16 years after initial ND regulations. If you want to read a really good (albeit boring) book on the matter check out "New deal or raw deal" by Burton W. Folsom.

    As for WWII ending the war I've also read this is not true. Think of this: If this is true why don't we have constant "fake wars" with countries like Japan and Russia. We could build ships and weapons using our natural resources (land and human capital) then drive them out to sea and blow them up making sure all personnel leave safely on smaller crafts. Clearly this is a dumb idea, so why is a "real war" any different? Answer: It's not. War's are NOT good for an economy. They may boost up artificial indicators of an economy (stock market) for some companies (halliburton, KBR, Blackwater, etc) but the overall economy is actually worse off. They just took all of the labor, capital, and resources out of the country with nothing coming back in. When the gov't spends money it does NOT get anything back in the form of a profit. Thus, spending money on war just depletes the citizens who pay for the war.

    If you wonder why the economy started rising when the war was over just think of all the human resources that came back. In 1945-46 those who were over seas were able to come back and companies could now hire talented people whereas before there were not as many.

    You say you don't want info from org's like Mises institute, but why? You'll take Paul Krugman's theories/ideas but not Mises? Krugman is an elementary economist compared to Ludwig von Mises, Murray N. Rothbard, F.A. Hayek and other Austrian economists.

    Reply

  • Ardentfrost

    Ardentfrost

    March 11, 2015, 6:30 am

    That baby lobster tail sounds pretty good. I'm in for that recipe.

    Also the turkey brine if you're willing to let it be known. My brine is very simple (I'm trying to remember off hand, but it might just be brown sugar in the brine liquid... maybe a couple spices) and while the turkey always comes out tasty, I wouldn't mind bringing the flavor up a bit.

    When I first started cooking I did a bit of baking. Now-a-days I don't do any, partly because I stopped eating sugar (though I do make an occasional exception for pumpkin pie this time of year).

    Reply

  • ASupertramp

    ASupertramp

    March 10, 2015, 8:54 am

    I'm not sure if this is proper "reddiquitte," or even how to spell that word apparently, but I generally downvote things if I find them uninteresting, offensive, repetitive, etc. I don't bare any particular ill will towards submitters. I've just always figured the arrows are there to let you express your opinion whether it is positive or negative. I also don't understand why people get so hung-up on whether people downvote them. I mean it's cool to have people like you, but with so many users it's inevitable that at least some people won't.

    P.S. I thought your coffee mold was cool.

    Reply

  • Fauster

    Fauster

    March 11, 2015, 3:12 am

    It also sounds more like a night terror (with sleep paralysis) than a nightmare. A night terror usually has little in the way of real plot, and is accompanied by feelings of sheer terror and helplessness in the face of an unstoppable, crushing force. And night terrors are simply horrifying in a way that can't be compared to anything. The most abstract night terror I had was that I was a pin balanced point up on an infinite white marble floor. A bulldozer was coming to crush me, but it went on for what seemed an eternity. In another, I was simply paralyzed by the fear that I got AIDS from tylenol (I was a kid in the early 80's). I woke up screaming and it took my dad twenty minutes to convince me I wasn't dying.

    And who knows maybe the girl that kept the owner up was a screamer in bed. But otherwise, any suggestion of a ghost or haunting could set the theme for a night terror.

    Reply

  • introspeck

    introspeck

    March 10, 2015, 10:22 pm

    I worked at a chicken farm (egg production). 50,000 birds in big warehouse-sized building! They were on the second floor, in wire cages, so their shit could drop down to the concrete floor below. They'd bulldoze it out to the field out back when it reached 3 feet deep. You can imagine what the place smelled like on a hot summer day when I'd show up with a hangover. Or maybe you can't. That's probably better.

    But that isn't the worst part. Once a week you had to pull the chickens that had died during the week out of their cages. The ones that had died yesterday... not a problem. But if they'd died early in the week - the head would come off when you tried to pick up the carcass. And the smell OH GHOD GAAAAHHH

    Reply

  • doomstork

    doomstork

    March 10, 2015, 4:51 pm

    I don't like shaved muffs. I don't like a landing strip. I don't like it trimmed. I want it to look exactly how it's supposed to look, even if resembles a hedge. In reality, very few women have hedge-like pubic regions, so that isn't a worry. That is what I want and that is how I like it.

    The only trouble I have is this: I'm a very judgemental person. If another man tells me he prefers it shaved or even "trimmed so it looks neat" I immediately think less of him. I just can't help it. I feel the same about men who like being submissive or so-called "metrosexuals". I know I'm the weird one to think this way, but I just lump them all together in one group in my mind, and I see that activity as a rejection of one's masculinity and thus abhorrent. How very piggish of me.

    Reply

  • rgladstein

    rgladstein

    March 10, 2015, 10:33 am

    My freshman year of college, my roommate told me about this woman from LA he'd met who was the coolest person in the world. He was gay, so this wasn't a sexual thing -- he was just really impressed by her attitude.

    To illustrate how cool she was, he told me about going shopping with her at a used bookstore. They were looking over some greeting cards, and when they were ready to leave she took the one she was holding and just dropped it on the floor instead of putting it back in the rack. He asked her if she was going to pick it up and she replied, "There are people who work here."

    Pretty cool, huh? I'm reminded of that story every time I see a commercial for Aleve that's been running lately. A woman is putting box after box of Tylenol into a shopping basket when she notices a box of Aleve and realizes she can buy just one box of Aleve instead of four boxes of Tylenol. So she puts the shopping basket on the floor, grabs the box of Aleve and walks away.

    Reply

  • shady8x

    shady8x

    March 11, 2015, 10:01 am

    >A major part of the problem (and not due to some secret feminist agenda) is the misconception that women cannot harm men

    Oh I agree, this is part of the gender stereotypes that feminism is usually against. The problem is that feminism is a female centric movement(look at the name) and as such, focuses on women's problems. That is not a problem in itself. But by highlighting how women are hurt without spending similar amount of time highlighting how men are hurt, their highlighting actions reinforce the belief that women are victims to men and men aren't victims to women. This happens even though most in the feminist movement do not agree with and probably don't intend for that message to be sent.

    In the absence of a strong men centric or equality movement that highlights how men are hurt or spends equal time on both, that is an unintended consequence that is almost impossible to avoid.

    >Of course, on the flip side of things, anytime you defend yourself against anyone, you run the risk of escalating the violence.

    As this study shows when violence escalates, it is the men that are hurt more. Personally I was rather surprised when I read that. If it is true than it is actually smart for men to run away from women instead of defending themselves...

    Reply

  • LWRellim

    LWRellim

    March 11, 2015, 9:13 am

    >Actually, a lot of teams don't do the donation per mile/lap anymore, at least in my experience. For my teams, over the years, we've always asked for a straight donation of any amount. I've always let them know that a person on our team will always be walking through the entire event (about 12 hours) and physical items are great too (since we can auction them off at the event).

    So then what, pray tell, is the *point* of the whole walk/run thingee? I mean a straight donation for a worthy cause doesn't really *need* to have a bunch of "teams" walking/running -- it accomplishes nothing really (may as well be digging holes and then filling them back in again).

    >Even I would be tempted to decline an invitation to sponser on a per-mile or per-lap basis.

    Well, every one that has been *pushed* into my face has always been of that nature -- it's always a "per mile" thingee. (Which, as I have said has a "fraud" aspect to it.)

    And sadly, in addition to the attempted "guilt tripping" there ARE also passive-aggressive repercussions & retaliations in the workplace for anyone who regularly refuses to "support" the team -- you can get away with an occasional refusal by citing a "tight month" but continued rejections marginalize you.

    It has literally become a new "church tithe" in many companies -- with the organizer filling the role of preacher/denouncer.

    >The event itself,for my team anyway, is there to celebrate those who have survived while also raffling/auctioning donations as well as selling food items to get that last push of money for the charity. This year we had done well enough to give ribbons away that we had made and made about $300 auctioning off physical donations.

    Ah, so it's a *social event* (again much like a church) -- and you can then justify using some of the donation money to pay for said event (and goodies) -- especially if you can auction off excess goodies and geewgaws and recover all the costs, plus add a few bucks to the kitty as well.

    *I'm beginning to think the only defense against this (other than owning or NOT working in an office or business that allows such things) -- would be to counter with a request/demand for a donation to "The 5th Annual Church of Scientology Anti-Psychiatry Crawl" or something similarly outlandish/bogus.*

    Reply

  • emacsen

    emacsen

    March 10, 2015, 6:49 pm

    Second issue first... CLOS.

    After having used Clojure's multiple dispatch, I think it's more simple, cleaner and more powerful.

    CLOS can dispatch based on type, or based on value. Clojure lets you dispatch based on the return value of a function. That means you can do things that would be impossible in CLOS. For example you might be looking at records to sort and decide which sorting algorithm to use based on the number of records (ie a length or count function). With Clojure you can do that.

    The benefits of OO are mitigated when you have multiple dispatch, so you can go back to simpler data structures.

    As for dynamically scoped variables, I don't see why I'd use that in production code other than as constants (ala in Emacs)

    Reply

  • mycatdiedofaids

    mycatdiedofaids

    March 10, 2015, 8:28 am

    For the sake of speculation: Your dog of 6 years just died, your mom and dad divorced without warning, you haven't paid off your student loans, you yourself were molested as a child, you live alone and haven't met anyone in 3 years who even seem like they might be date-worthy, oh and then your entire career is over because of some allegations, which ended up being incorrectly covered by the media, so you have now for sure lost any ability to hold your head up while you walk the halls of your school. Wouldn't you be tempted to commit suicide?

    Edit: for clarification, I have no idea if any of that is true, I just made something up that seemed like a reasonable conclusion.

    Edit2: for further clarification, I was agreeing.

    Reply

  • sempuki

    sempuki

    March 11, 2015, 6:56 am

    I wrote her to tell her I didn't think it was right to falsify charges publicly, and thus have a hand in his death, then post-death convict him as guilty. I told her she has blood on her hands, and I hope she's sued.

    She called me a pedo and told me she'd forwarded my email to "police". I live in Europe, so I'm not concerned with Toronto police harassing me because I prefer to have courts of law judge cases, not self-righteous sleazy "journalists".

    Just so you know, if you're all pedos.

    Reply

  • otterplay

    otterplay

    March 10, 2015, 7:12 pm

    No. Without a proportional representation system (like New Zealand has) splintering one or the other of the two major parties just leads to the other side winning *all the time*. This is the problem that the left wing in Canada is facing right now.

    You don't need a political party to form a cohesive voice which can be heard. All you need is a mainstream media outlet.

    I think the more prudent course would be to try to take over both the republican and the democratic parties from the inside. Then you have good governance, no matter who wins the election. Once you've done that, then it might be possible to institute a proportional representation system, and then finally, you could start creating smaller parties, which would actually have seats in congress.

    Reply

  • onezerozeroone

    onezerozeroone

    March 10, 2015, 8:04 am

    I'm also convinced that there's a "conspiracy" involving TV crime and drama shows.

    Like how in a standoff the two guys always just point guns at each other and squint and glare and banter. As if the other guy could shoot you back after getting shot point blank in the face by a .45, so you have to be careful and talk him down.

    In a real situation the standoff would end immediately with the cop giving you several helpings of a hot lead sandwich.

    Or how everyone on Cops always consents to searches, always waives their rights and spills their guts, etc.

    I think it's brainwashing to get the audience to believe that's how you're *supposed* to act in those situations.

    Reply

  • familynight

    familynight

    March 11, 2015, 12:51 am

    Even if you don't agree with it and even if my personal list would also contain more <7% abv beers, I fail to see how the list is bullshit. There are some great lower (or, really, normal) alcohol beers out there, but there probably aren't more on the list because, imo, even the better ones tend to run together, particularly when they aren't super fresh. Putting sours aside, you can add more flavors and turn out a more unique product in a bigger beer. Of course, I love many smaller beers, but I can remember the flavors from far more individual imperial stouts and IPAs than I can stouts and IPAs or pale ales.

    I like big flavors, but many bigger beers don't lack for subtlety. In the good ones, there can be a ton of different things going on. On the other hand, I think balance is a meaningless term in beer and probably was popularized by English snobs.

    Reply

  • squeazel

    squeazel

    March 11, 2015, 3:33 am

    Because kids might expect me to share the PS3 and Wii!

    I generally assumed that I'd grow up, get married and have a kid or two. It wasn't until a couple of years ago that I started to really think about whether I actually wanted children or not. My husband really doesn't like kids and never wants to have any. That certainly factors in for me but it's a decision I have to make for myself as well, it's too important an issue for me to just let him decide. So I'm still kind of undecided. Right now I'm thirty and have no burning desire to have any kids. Medically it'd be pretty impossible for me to bear my own right now anyway. And the older I get the less I think I want them. I have occasional moments where I think it'd be nice. We'd have a child to teach how the world works and I think we could raise a pretty kick-ass responsible person. And then I encounter kids out and about and even the quiet ones seem like such a pain in the ass. :P Never mind the ones that are screaming or throwing temper tantrums.

    Right now I like my life. While I think my husband and I could be really good parents it's a huge life change that neither of us are willing to make right now. Maybe we never will be. Having kids just might not be the life we want to lead.

    Reply

  • kingnemo

    kingnemo

    March 11, 2015, 2:15 am

    I worked on a trade desk for almost a decade as a quant trader (software background). I learned quite a lot from doing research, reading books and actual trading. I wouldn't recommend anyone to daytrade their own money unless they've had a lot of trading experience, then you know what you're getting into and how horrible a drawdown feels.

    Good point about the random. No matter how good of a quant you are, you need to know when things have truly changed and change your overall strategy, which comes from the gut.

    I'm surprised you had a rough year last year, though. Sept-Oct were high times. Did you get nailed on a one or two positions?

    Reply

  • podperson

    podperson

    March 11, 2015, 3:44 am

    I think that from the later baby boomers and onward the pace of change has been so consistently high that what we're used to is flux.

    I'm 44 (which makes me on the old end of "gen-x"). My class in high school was the first in the school to be offered "computer studies" as an option. When I started university we were the first freshmen comp sci students to get interactive terminals (VT100s). I took a portable manual typewriter to college with me, and by the time I left I was using page layout software.

    Almost every thing I learned to do with a computer I learned using version 1.0 -- from operating systems and word processors to databases, graphics programs, and web browsers.

    One of the things that differentiates the "change" generations from the older generations is we're used to learning how to figure out how to use arbitrary things (and then forgetting about it) rather than learning how to use specific things (and then memorizing it). We don't buy in to particular solutions -- everything is provisional.

    My guess is that we'll all gradually ossify (I don't need no stinking CS14, my old CS6 works just fine) but because we've all been drowning in change since we were kids, I suspect we'll adapt pretty well.

    I also suspect that the rate of change may actually decline. E.g. computers have pretty much run into a wall lately (my three year old laptop is about 80% as fast as its current generation replacement). Most of the performance advancement in computers for some time has been in fabrication, and GPUs are now hitting the same walls CPUs ran into five years ago. Not everything is going to parallelize nicely anyway.

    Maybe we'll be the old codgers complaining that nothing is changing or getting fixed. "When's freaking Photoshop CS21 coming out? Why don't they fix this stupid thing? We used to get a new release every year whether we wanted it or not."

    Edits: correctness and clarity.

    Reply

  • Willravel

    Willravel

    March 10, 2015, 11:08 am

    It's not covert, Iran revealed it to the IAEA voluntarily, well ahead of their legal schedule (6 months before operation is what's legally required). Moreover, Iran has said unequivocally that they will allow inspectors into their new facility, just as they have into their existing facility. The IAEA as well as every American intelligence agency has said that there's no evidence that Iran has or is building nuclear weapons.

    Iran seems to be demonstrating through concrete steps that it is living up to the NPT.

    The US and Israel, on the other hand, have been dead set for decades on convincing the world that Iran is a huge nuclear threat. Clinton, Bush, and now Obama are out fear mongering and it seems to be less and less effective as time goes on. Public opinion is shifting on Iran (which after the lies and distortions about Iraq seems to just be common sense), and soon the US government will shift away from an antagonistic stance to one of cautious cooperation.

    Israel still has not chosen to sign the NPT, despite being asked by the IAEA and a UN resolution.

    Reply

  • benjoffe

    benjoffe

    March 10, 2015, 2:14 pm

    > if you make a wrong move early, you can "solve" 90% of the puzzle easily before realizing that you made a contradiction somewhere that makes most of your results bunk.

    I agree, this kind of problem will become even more important as the number of players increases. One important thing to note is that my current heuristic keeps a modification when a change is made that does not increase nor decrease the number of wins, which means that sometimes when it does get stuck for a while the deck still evolves slightly over time.

    > Instead I'd* try and look at the underlying precepts of "why is this particular arrangement cut-proof?" Is there an underlying pattern to the ordering of cards in the relatively easy-to-generate two player deals? (The dealer will get higher cards if there's an odd number of cards cut, but flushes are easier to come by on even numbered cut, perhaps.) Then extrapolate that to N-player deals.

    I've had very little luck in trying to find some meaning in the results, I think that is a very difficult thing. One line of attack can be to ignore flushes and try to get the number of wins as high as possible.

    When it stalls, then try to assign suits to the cards that give the dealer flushes in the remaining permutations (flushes can be made to give a player a win at least 16/52 of the permutatoins, possibly more). Though again, full houses are a real pain there...

    Reply

  • baddox

    baddox

    March 10, 2015, 12:50 pm

    But there's already a difference between me, at age 22, and "old" people like my parents and grandparents. I have a working knowledge of how things like OTA broadcasts, CRT televisions, and microwave ovens work. All of those were around when my parents were young, yet they don't understand those much either.

    The difference isn't their intelligence or even resistance to learning new things. The different is what they are curious and passionate about. I'm not as curious as my dad about history and political science, or as curious as my mom about banking and accounting. My parents are quite current on those two issues, just as I am quite current on technology. I suspect most people stick with their passions throughout their life. The fact that *most* old people seem ignorant about technology is probably because when they were growing up, technology wasn't as accessible or prominent.

    Reply

  • omginorite

    omginorite

    March 10, 2015, 10:02 am

    I remember this was something my parents told the kid psychiatrist about when I was 10 - not that I did it, but that I was so markedly annoyed when other people did it. I would scream at my brother, then 5, almost every night at the dinner table. The shrink said that it was indicative of ADD because I would hone in on a sound. It's still one of the reasons I fucking hate being around children. You know what's almost as bad? I dunno, it might be worse - when people scrape their forks against their teeth, just ever so slightly, and it makes that wretched nails on a chalkboard sound. This noise has resulted in my husband being moments away from death multiple times.

    Reply

  • recreational

    recreational

    March 10, 2015, 3:01 pm

    You:

    "I never said we did. 20% of Israel is Arab, and another 5% is some other form of non-Jewish. We Jews here have our own internal divisions. What the hell are you on about?"

    As you say; every ethnic group is made up of other ethnic groups, dividing down along culture and tribe and status and family lines.

    None of these groups have a "right" to self-determination. They're all separate people. That doesn't give them the right to pick where they'll parcel shared land and kick out the current inhabitants.

    The pursuit of racial purity is a rube's game. If you don't object to Arabs in Israel- presumably- why do you object to Palestinians?

    As for Gaza not being in Israel; when you've got a region surrounded, blockaded, settled and invasively controlled, it better damn well be part of your country if you're not at war with it.

    I mean, there's questions of why Jews are creating ghettos in the first place, but even aside from that.

    Reply

  • zappini

    zappini

    March 10, 2015, 5:35 pm

    hi uhohgonnadie-

    The mortality awareness comes in cycles over your lifetime. Here's what little wisdom I have to offer...

    Think about something else. Force yourself to think about something else. It's a kind of mental discipline.

    I survived a few life threatening illnesses as a kid, have chronic health issues, volunteered at hospice, etc. Death has been front and center in my life for 24 years, thus far.

    When I was in the hospital, during the most life threatening parts, I was accepting of my death. I had been meditating quite a bit, really into zen and Buddhism (philosophy, not religion). The people around me were kind of freaked by how cool I was about the whole thing. (Work with the terminally ill and you'll learn to recognize acceptance in others.)

    Afterwards, I had a very hard time reintegrating back into day to day living. It's hard to care about the bills when you're keenly aware that you're wormbait.

    Alas, I still had things to live for. Over time, I lost my acceptance, anxiety about mortality resumed it's rightful place. The positive side is I started holding jobs, paying off bills (fucking insurance companies), etc.

    I think that anxiety is deep human psyche and necessary. We wouldn't strive to give life purpose and meaning without it.

    Up until about 5 years ago, I'd have these waking nightmares, like death panics. As in not knowing if I'm alive or dead. They're freaky and intense. Not hallucinations, but an altered state of awareness. I'm glad that's over (fingers crossed).

    Through it all, pretty much the only strategy that works for me is to keep busy. Most of life's issues are not resolvable. So just keep marching forward.

    When you get knocked onto your ass, pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and resume marching. There really isn't any other choice. You can take some heart knowing that every other person is struggling with the exact same issues (someday).

    I found a couple pet issues to get worked up about. Got VERY involve in politics. And stay comfortably mind numbing busy.

    I also have a kid and have dated quite a bit. It's helpful to have something outside of yourself to focus on.

    Good luck with your obsession. I hope you find a way to channel that energy into something that gives you joy, makes you laugh, something to be proud of, etc.

    All the best.

    Reply

  • Turil

    Turil

    March 11, 2015, 3:08 am

    Furthermore (from the archives of Turil)...

    Existential Rights

    (aka, Animal Vegetable Mineral Rights)

    Who gets rights?

    Existence is the only common trait that I require of another individual or thing for it to have the same basic rights as I wish for myself. Not just life, but actual physical (or non-physical) existence. So yes, a rock, a tree, a cat, a human, a universe, and a beam of light all have the same rights as I do.

    What are those rights?

    I've recently become fond of the idea that individual things (animal, vegetable, mineral, or otherwise) have the right to do whatever they do. It works for me because that's reality - individual things do indeed do what they do :-) And, after trying for decades, I realized that it's nearly impossible to win in an argument with reality! So believing that things have a right to do what they do means that rocks have a right to just sit there, roll down a hill, or disintegrate, if that is what they do. And trees have a right to grow, shed their leaves, or fall over, if that is what they do. And cats and humans have a right to eat, sleep, pounce, juggle, drool, and/or eat cheese on Wednesdays. And the sun has a right to implode and turn into a black whole if it implodes and turns into a black hole. And the Universe has a right to expand, or contract, or multiply, or whatever it does. Now, obviously this also means that individual things have a right to be annoyed by the things that other individual things do, and to actively try and stop them, too.

    What does this mean for me?

    I have the right, as something that exists, to try to continue to exist, and the way I'm doing that is by trying to protect my own health and the health of those other things that I rely upon (my planet, my community, my family, my bicycle, and my friends). My goal is to keep everyone else happy and healthy so that I can be happy and healthy, and I will continue to assert my rights to do that until I no longer exist :-)

    This philosophy makes me very happy, since it leaves room for reality (including the likelyhood of me being wrong, occasionally...) and also allows me to do whatever I believe is the right thing for creating a future that is better than the past or present. And it allows me to learn from others, who have different ideas about what is right. So yeah, this philosophy really works well for me.

    Reply

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